Latinos

Detroit BLM co-founder vows to continue fight for police reform, housing equity

BY: - June 4, 2021

Detroit Will Breathe (DWB) co-founder Nakia Wallace said this week that her anti-police brutality organization and city officials continue to have sharp differences when it comes to the treatment of those who were arrested during Black Lives Matter protest rallies in 2020 and labeled a crime-fighting initiative by the new police chief a “stop-and-frisk” plan.   […]

Bipartisan police reforms win broad support at Senate hearing

BY: - June 3, 2021

A package of bipartisan police reform bills received the backing of Democratic and Republican lawmakers, a retired police detective, a civil rights lawyer and others during a state Senate Judiciary and Public Safety Committee hearing on Thursday. The bills would create guidelines for investigations into officer-involved deaths, limit no-knock warrants and boost support for de-escalation […]

COMMENTARY

Angela Vasquez-Giroux: Where is the allyship for BIPOC women in politics?

BY: - April 27, 2021

We’ve been talking a lot about what it’s like to be a woman working in politics in Lansing – a long overdue conversation that is finally shedding some light on the sexual harassment, toxic workplaces and abusive bosses that chased all too many of us out of jobs we loved and excelled at.  And, as […]

How the pandemic hit students in Michigan’s most disadvantaged schools hardest

BY: - March 6, 2021

Michigan has over 800 school districts that all individually felt the pain of COVID-19, but the state’s Partnership schools and districts were among the hardest hit by the pandemic.  Under the former Gov. Rick Snyder administration in 2017, the state formed the Michigan Partnership Model to improve the state’s lowest-performing public and charter schools and […]

After threats and armed protests, BIPOC lawmakers still struggle to get GOP leaders to address racial justice

BY: and - February 4, 2021

State Rep. Sarah Anthony (D-Lansing) grew up during the 1980s and 1990s and remembers watching in astonishment the awarding-winning PBS documentary series, “Eyes on the Prize: America’s Civil Rights Movement.” The African American lawmaker was raised in a Capital City community where whites and people of color interacted, for the most part, without incident. “What […]

‘I went to the polls for humanity’: Immigrant voters want DACA passed, ‘Muslim ban’ and child separation ended

BY: - November 16, 2020

In the days leading up to the Nov. 3 election, Deysi Cordoba took to her keyboard: “Vote,” the 19-year-old nursing student from Grand Rapids wrote to her friends. Her fingers flew as she typed. Cast your ballots, she urged, for those who cannot, like herself. Vote, she said, because it could make the difference in […]

Supreme Court ruling on Voting Rights Act opened floodgates for new restrictions

BY: and - October 7, 2020

It hadn’t even been a day since the U.S. Supreme Court dismantled one of the pillars of voting rights in America, and North Carolina lawmakers weren’t wasting any time. Republican legislators had been contemplating a bill that would require photo identification to vote. The bill had plenty of support, but it had spent the past […]

‘I just don’t trust the system any more’: Voters on edge as election nears.

BY: and - October 5, 2020

WASHINGTON — Widespread anxiety and confusion around voting, compounded by the pandemic that has spread to millions of Americans, including President Donald Trump. A vastly underfunded and decentralized electoral system that could take days and possibly weeks to certify results.  Attempts to suppress voting, interfere with elections and cast doubt on the integrity of mail-in […]

‘An assistant teacher, lunch lady, janitor and IT person’: Parents juggle, struggle amid COVID-19 crisis

BY: - September 28, 2020

Being a parent of young children can be a challenge under normal circumstances. The COVID-19 pandemic has naturally made that much tougher for many families. Theresa Mitchell is a mother of two young Detroit Public Schools Community District (DPSCD) students who are being educated online. Mitchell preferred for them to learn in-person, but there were […]

What’s in a name? Debate continues as Hispanic Heritage Month begins. 

BY: - September 15, 2020

Whatever you do, don’t call Elena Herrada Hispanic or Mexican American.  “I never liked the term ‘Mexican American’ because it marginalizes us. I refer to myself as a ‘Chicana,’” said Herrada, who earned a degree in Chicano-Boricua Studies from Wayne State University, is a former Detroit Board of Education member and now is a talk […]

COMMENTARY

Rick Haglund: Blacks have lost ground in Michigan — and it’s dragging down the economy

BY: - September 12, 2020

In his long career as a University of Michigan labor economist, Don Grimes never focused his research on race-based income inequality. “I’ve always believed in the power of markets,” Grimes told me.  “I figured the markets would sort this out.”  But a new study he, and U of M colleagues Gabriel Ehrlich and Michael McWilliams […]

COMMENTARY

Column: 5 ways higher education can be seen as hostile to women of color

BY: - August 21, 2020

Editor’s note: In 2019, Amy Bonomi, a women’s studies scholar at Michigan State University, co-edited “Women Leading Change: Breaking the Glass Ceiling, Cliff, and Slipper.” The book examines the perspectives of 23 female leaders on issues of leadership and the challenges of confronting structural racism, bias and discrimination at colleges and universities. Here are five […]